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20130121
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not have a record of substantial negotiation-- a la henry kissinger, jim baker. it's hard to find things like that on in her record, but on representational side, very strong performance. also in terms of being loyal to president obama. the obama white house was concerned in the beginning, that this superstar, part of team clinton, was going to over-shadow the president and the white house. they were very controlling sometimes in how they methods foreign policy, but secretary clinton never stepped on anybody's toes. she always left it to the president to take the lead on things. so i think that was a sign that she was a team player. i find, charlie, more people from both parties today saying that they thought she did a good job, and that she showed that she has real depth. then you would have found four years ago. >> rose: clearly it enhanced her reputation. >> i think so. >> rose: when you look forward to the service of john kerry, assuming what most people believe the obvious confirmation because he's of the senate himself, will he be a different secretary of state? >> would expect, ch
. what kind of relationship does he have with the governor? >> jim gets along with everybody in sacramento. that's one of the reasons why he's sort of an ideal chairman. he is a realist. he wants to get moderates into the party. he's not just -- he's not somebody who's just in the base sort of talk to himself. he's sick of the circular firing squad. so i think jim brolty is sort of kind of old-fashioned politics that we all now talk about that's so great. >> republican party is in the cellar in california, lowest level ever, 30% of the voters. this is a huge job for anybody. a lot of people feel if anybody can do it, jim can. he has lot of respect, a lot of contacts and donors. >> the chairmanship gets filled in march. thank you both for joining us. great to have you on the show. carla marinucci and debra saunders. that's all for tonight. visit us at kqed.org/thisweek for past episodes and segments, to subscribe to our pod cast and to share your story ideas. thanks for watching. good night. >> the following kqed production was produced in high definition. [ theme music plays
greatly weaken a president's recess appointment powers. >> as jim carney was mentioning earlier in that sound bite, he said this has been practiced and precedent for a long time. so is the likelihood that this particular rule cog have an effect on all sorts of presidential appointments going forward? >> absolutely. some people pointed out that many federal judges are sitting on the bench now thanks to their reaes-- recess appointments. and as a result of today's ruling of the three judge panel of the federal appeals court and the district of columbia, those judges appointments could be nullified. and there are prisoners sitting if prison nowadays thinking wait t this is good news. maybe my conviction, maybe my sentencing can be overturned because the judge who ordered my sentence was a recess appointment. >> so considering the magnitude of all this, the supreme court likely to take it up? >> i think so, hari. it's not absolutely clear but because this decision has so much import and because it's the same question being heard now by several different circuit courts and thus there
crow, not jim crow, jane crow meaning? >> you look at the abortion issue, the so-called personhood measures and anti-abortion measures, what they are really doing is creating precedent for a permanent underclass of all women. we have seen that women are being arrested, detained, forcibly subjected to medical interventions disproportionately so african-american women, disproportionately in the south. and, again, it's under the guise of being just about abortion. it's really about creating a set of precedents that would allow the state to control, surveil, and punish a woman from the moment she conceives. >> and you have been, frankly, losing in state after state, right? i mean, there are now 92 or 94 more provisions on state laws than existed several years ago. >> and i think the anti-choice movement is getting creative. what we saw recently in virginia and we saw it in a federal level but they're now doing this on a state level are things like the prenatal nondiscrimination act, which is an effort to ban race selective or sex selective abortion, and this is a policy that is not see
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)